Curious what everybody is running for spark plugs Also curious what intervals...

netboard

Curious what everybody is running for spark plugs. Also curious what intervals you guys are changing/checking them? I've got 450+ miles. So just figured I'd get some info before I dive into it. Thanks!

Pic For Attention

%d comments
  • the throttle response also seems to be better with it

  • Check mine at 4000 looked great, have 4700 on it now. I'm thinking 10k.

  • I'm running a ngk 7 something. But it's gapped down to .018. It helps so the turbo doesn't blow out the spark.

  • Your machine would benefit from an iridium plug gapped to .025

  • Need more voltage through the plug to run a bigger gap. I'll get giant coils one day

  • The required voltage to jump the gap of a fine wire plug is less than a standard plug.

  • Iridium in a performance turbo build? No thanks. Plain old NGK gapped accordingly. Platinum and iridium don't dissipate heat as well.

  • I run what's stock. And will stay there.

  • I think mine are stock. Unless Dasa swapped them out.

  • Sorry mine are a heat range 9. Cr9eb ngk R

  • CR9EB are stock, and copper. Cool.

  • You've got 4700 miles on your YXZ!

  • When I change them I'll install the EIX plugs.

  • Kevin Merrithew you might have a different heat range because of e85. Not sure on that

  • Yes year old last Sunday

  • Lol what?

  • Don't dissipate heat as well?

  • I put the CR9EIX in the day I brought it home...

  • I was gonna say Kevin 7 is kinda hot.... LoL

  • What's the difference?

  • Never mind. They are iridium, not copper.

  • i have OCD is the real reason ...

  • thats what was in there..then they asked me what i had..told them i didnt know..then i was told to get a cold plug like a 9. just happened to be what i already had.

  • cant go wrong with any NGK.

  • And Id go 1-2 heat ranges colder and close up gap a bit if turbo.

  • No need to change heat range for turbo. I run 20 psi and the heat range is perfect. You do need to close the gap though depending on boost level

  • k&t told me a 9 is good and .018 is where they run theirs.

  • stock plugs with 110 octane at 700miles

  • this is just a question. is that plug a little dark? like little to rich? im just asking cause i dont know much about reading plugs

  • Plug needs to be checked after a full WOT pull and then shut off. The plug in picture is too hard to read. Need to see electrode closer. Generally, you want the color change about where the bend is. But cool to hear what K&T suggests. I only shared from experience when boosting a previously non turbo engine. One range colder certainly wouldnt hurt anything... Especially at 20psi IMHO.

  • And absolutley no reason to run 110 octane unless youve increased compression and ignition timing. Plug looks a tad rich, but this could be just during idle. for a proper read, do a full pull at WOT and shut engine off. Remove plug and then you can see exactly whats going on when it matters, at WOT.

  • And in addition... the 110 octane may be causing the soot on your plug. higher the octane, the harder to burn. Thats why it helps prevent preignition and detonation.

  • They look black. Why would you use 110 octane

  • Lol. I do too! Now why u like the iridium over copper? They last longer, but other then that, the conductivity isn't better then copper. And I was thinking of changing them every 800miles, anyways.

  • I don't have a answer, I just have used the NGK racing plugs in everything.. these are essentially the "racing" plug.

  • Black on the end of the threads is the idle fueling. You can't read plugs for wot that have been ran. You need brand new plugs, do a wot pull and shut it down and pull them. Then you have to chop off the threads or have a special magnifier to see the porcelain. Looking at the electrode tells you very little. The ground strap will show you where the timing should be.

  • Spot on Greg, you're right. Memory got me there. Been a while since I've done it the old fashion way. Porcelain should be clean, cocoa brown when heat range is right. And of course, no peppering (sign of detonating). Proper timing on outer electrode (ground strap) if discoloration is right below curve. Thanks for catching that, sorry for the wrong info.

  • You're fine I was just clarifying for Kevin. I like to have a 2mm fuel ring at the very bottom of the porcelain. This all applies to gas. Reading plugs on E85 is quite a bit different.

  • That's what this page is for

  • Greg Rob..The ground strap will show you where the timing should be. what part is the ground strap? thats the tab that you adjust the gap with...right

  • Yes, heat propgates from the end where the spark is jumping from the electrode and moves back toward the threads which are acting as a heat sink. It will kind of anneal / oxidize the metal and leave a mark where the heat soak of the gound strap stops. On an overhead engine with an efficient combustion chamer, I want the timing mark where it is juuuuust starting to go around the bend of the strap. If it's closer to the tip, you can add timing, if it's heat soaking past the bend then either back it off, or add fuel if you aren't already at the ideal AFR. Another thing to add is you always want to leave yourself headroom for changing conditions and thats a great reason to read the plugs in the first place. If for example you can't tune it in the sand under super heavy load like climbing sand mtn in 5th, then leave the timing mark back away from the bend a little, and you have some head room.

  • but it has to be a new plug to see all that...right

  • It should be, theoretically the timing mark will show the highest heat the chamber saw. So it's more forgiving than the fueling as far as reading plugs go. What I like to do is have it warmed up and take it to the spot I'm going to read plugs, either track, dyno, or open stretch, etc. Then put in brand new plugs, do a wot run thru the gears and immediately kill the engine at the end of the run. That way I know I'm getting data from that small amount of idle time, launch, and run only.

  • Greg Rob thats a lot of work..lol cant i just guess..lol

  • You have knock sensor right? If it's calibrated properly just let it rip. You can see when the ecu hears knock, and it will protect the engine by pulling timing if it does. So if you have an area in the tune where you consistently see knock retard, the remove timing from that area and you're good to go.

  • That is if you want to be lazy

  • Lol

  • i dont have one. been told e85 doesnt det at all.

  • That's bull shit.

  • lol i dont even know how to get into my motec. it recorders everything and my guy looks it over..lol

  • really?

  • I promise you E85 can detonate. Even Methanol can detonate.....